Sudan military chiefs agree on plan to end civil war

This article is over 2 months old Abdel Fattah al-Sisi called a meeting with the Sudanese Armed Forces chief, Sadiq al-Mahdi, to plot a peace deal to end three years of civil war Sudan’s…

Sudan military chiefs agree on plan to end civil war

This article is over 2 months old

Abdel Fattah al-Sisi called a meeting with the Sudanese Armed Forces chief, Sadiq al-Mahdi, to plot a peace deal to end three years of civil war

Sudan’s military chief and ousted prime minister, along with other senior military figures, have agreed on a plan to reinstate the country’s prime minister and free thousands of political prisoners in an effort to end three years of civil war, according to the state-run Ahram news agency.

Leaders of the Islamist ruling party, ousted from power earlier this year after months of civil unrest, had demanded the release of all political prisoners and the reinstatement of Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who had been reappointed prime minister after ousting Yousuf Ressam.

The former military chief of staff, al-Sisi, who had also been prime minister for four months, had previously negotiated peace deals with rebels in Darfur and South Kordofan in 2017, only to see the deals fall apart.

The Sudanese armed forces chief, Mohamed Tawil, met Sisi on Friday in Cairo after weeks of negotiations in Cairo aimed at ending the armed conflict in Sudan’s regions of Blue Nile and South Kordofan.

Sisi called the meeting of the Sudanese armed forces chief, Sadiq al-Mahdi, along with other prominent military figures in his office, Ahram said.

In a televised statement on state television, Sisi said officials from the Sudanese armed forces and the National Congress party would lay out a plan aimed at ending the bloodshed, the restoration of the authority of the prime minister and freedom for political prisoners.

Sudan’s armed forces have fought against rebels in the two regions since 2011, when south Sudan’s civil war ended and merged into the larger, Muslim-majority north. The insurgency in South Kordofan and Blue Nile led to a food crisis.

Opposition figures say there are some 100,000 political prisoners in Sudan who have been arrested since 2011 and previously detained by the military. Most of the arrests took place in August and September when the military dismantled two opposition camps in the Red Sea state, marking the deepest clampdown on the opposition since the fall of Sisi’s predecessor, Omar al-Bashir.

The Sudanese army, the most powerful force in the country, and the government have accused its political opponents of treason and plotting a “civil war in the north”.

The Al-Mahdi camp established in Khartoum had become the last bastion of opposition from the ruling party. According to Ahram, Sisi agreed on the following reforms to an end to the conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile:

Parliament must approve the redeployment of armed forces units in South Kordofan and Blue Nile.

The government must stop arresting, imprisoning and besieging the Red Sea party in Khartoum.

A law must be passed to allow civil rights to be exercised without discrimination.

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