Will Amazon’s river of cash transform our planet?

The Beaver Dam is in British Columbia, Canada, and was built in 1931 to relieve flooding in the Fraser River. You can see it in action here. The dam is about as long as…

Will Amazon's river of cash transform our planet?


The Beaver Dam is in British Columbia, Canada, and was built in 1931 to relieve flooding in the Fraser River. You can see it in action here.

The dam is about as long as a football field and is made up of approximately 35,000 cubic meters of solid concrete, including most of the support structure.

Video clip: Ty Richardson, Seth Pryor, and Ian Frazier at the Beaver Dam:

Here is Frazier’s description of it, complete with beautiful watercolor illustrations:

The Global Warming worsening the air? The forest is losing. The wind is going nowhere. We are the only ones who care about the trees and who can do something about it. Every waking hour there is something new taking place. It is happening again and again and it is hard to let it go. The trees are slowly dying. It’s not really fast, it’s slow, but everyone must step up and take action on this. It really is time.

The trees can’t fight back because they are way too small. Not exactly small. Anywhere from 6 feet to 8 feet (2 to 3 meters) tall can be counted on. Maybe they should be even larger. But they can’t fight back because they are way too small.

Maybe they should be grown on swaths of land, but no one has been willing to get land big enough for that. They should maybe just grow on the beaches and the foreshore. The ground is the place to be and water is the thing to stop. Lots of swamps are available for the medium-sized trees. In other words, it’s possible.

Maybe the trees should be grown in drought-resistant shrubs. The shrubs would grow and be called “tree shrubs” and they would not rot.

Maybe there is too much flooding for the trees. They can’t fight it.

Maybe there is not enough water to grow the trees. It could also be the same thing that happened before. There is no proof that the glaciers stopped going in 1901 when it was warm enough for the forests to grow, but if you put another 1.5 million people living in Alaska in this picture today, they would look very similar to what you see in this picture. This article from the Atlanta-Journal Constitution quotes an author who may have made this observation in 1948, so we can look back to a time when it was warmer for a bit. It is also possible that we need to act now because the waters have started rising again from the Pacific Ocean. It is more dangerous than we realize. All climates have their ups and downs. We are a global community. Global warming will change all weather patterns. Not every climate has a glacier in it. One day, one river will rise high enough to flood farmland or slough off a town. It may not matter if the water originates in the Arctic Ocean, the Great Lakes, the Atlantic Ocean, or in the Gulf of Mexico, because the global warming would impact the entire globe. Canada, the USA, and other parts of the world are part of the global climate. We have been in the climate and we can help the other nations to become self-sufficient in their defense because they won’t need as much food to support themselves or their people. When and if the glaciers start melting once again, they will go down in flood again and again and again. Flood in the Hudson Valley. Flood in the Central Valley. Flood in the Potomac, San Joaquin Valley, Arkansas, Arkansas River, Tennessee, Louisiana, and everywhere else. Flood destroys crops, crops destroy people.

What can we do about it? How can we change our climate without humans and their impact? What can we do, each one of us, when it comes to farming and food and the environment? What can we do each day to make our collective voice heard? There is more that we can do, but it takes action and that is hard, and often our little voices aren’t loud enough.

Who knows what will happen in the future. But it is up to us to help shape the future, now.

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