What’s going into your bottle of wine or gin this July 4?

One of the most quintessential charms of the Fourth of July weekend is going out of town with family and friends and ripping open a bottle of wine or two to bring back with…

What’s going into your bottle of wine or gin this July 4?

One of the most quintessential charms of the Fourth of July weekend is going out of town with family and friends and ripping open a bottle of wine or two to bring back with you to celebrate the beginning of our independence from British rule. But in addition to settling all public policy disagreements, the holiday has also become a major moneymaker for the beverage industry, the largest it’s ever been. Americans spend $1.5 billion on their favorite summertime drinks every year — so big that it has eclipsed the Boxing Day — and the largest beer, wine and spirits companies tap some $120 million worth of imported booze from vineyards in Europe just to clear their warehouse shelves ahead of Fourth of July. So what happened to their beloved back stock?

Don’t fret: If you’re looking for that imported booze to bring back with you to celebrate your Independence Day, you won’t be having to steal from a draw. The bottled wine and spirit shelves in major grocery stores and liquor stores in New Jersey are stocked with a variety of imported bottles. As for your standard varietals, like California’s sparkling Riesling, consider Iceland’s Solstice or Chile’s Malbec. To keep things interesting, and perhaps to make it more complicated, can also find ready-to-drink wine made of hybrid grapes that are newly created from the two main types of red grape.

But, as you probably know by now, it’s the small brands and craft beers that make American liquor stores and grocery stores popular, and as it turns out, some of the smaller-end brands are still having trouble getting their shipments in. It looks like Americans are going to have to hope for a post-Brexit wine and spirits boom to bring home the “Reds & Roses.”

Read the full story at Wall Street Journal.

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