These are the 15 most important congressional races across the nation in the 2018 midterm elections

During the previous presidential administration, “there was a hodgepodge of policies that impacted each state differently,” said Randy Patton, chief of trade for the Western Growers Association. But over the past four years, he…

These are the 15 most important congressional races across the nation in the 2018 midterm elections


During the previous presidential administration, “there was a hodgepodge of policies that impacted each state differently,” said Randy Patton, chief of trade for the Western Growers Association. But over the past four years, he says, there’s been an undeniable domino effect: “Our nation was very lucky in those first two years that there was no MERS, there was no climate change, there was no clear plan or direction for consumers to realize that commodities needed to be raised as efficiencies for environmental sustainability … In the last two years, that storm has picked up speed and people understand that this is something we need to be investing in today, not in the future.”

“There’s been a lot of increased pressure on our farmers and ranchers to raise food for a growing population. While we are doing a good job of doing that, we haven’t grown the number of acres of land under cultivation that we need,” said Agri-Business Council President Scott Mulvihill. “One thing we do need to do is not restrict agricultural production. I know some people would like to change our agricultural policy, and change the way we do things, but I don’t think it’s really necessary at this time. The changes that we need in our agricultural policies are going to require us to work to improve the economic systems.”

“For 40 years, I have been working very hard to become the best salmon grower. Every spring, it’s a challenge,” said James MacAulay, president of MacAulay Fisheries in Salinas, Calif. “It started in the ’80s with wild salmon and threatened by dams. We built a 600-million-gallon hatchery on that same section of the river that was starting to change over with warm water. Today, we actually have a huge amount of population growth, and we have a lot of salmon disease — all these things are competing with us, and salmon fisheries are struggling.”

“Our goal right now is to fight to get our vote,” said Wayne Johnson, a cattleman from Bolivar, Texas. “My family’s been growing food in this country for 250 years. I’ve been in agriculture since I was 12 years old. If the top five items that are on this ballot were to pass, I would think that the Texas Tribune approach might just be the best way to go. Everybody at the table. On both sides. Right now, the Texas Tribune is trying to give us a lot of new and different ideas. The time has come.”

“We do need to be prepared for natural disasters, and not only that, we also need to be prepared for our agricultural policy changes. We have the best brands in the world, and it has to be sustainable,” said Gene Parker, vice president of the Woodlands Farms, a swine production company with clients in more than 50 states. “There are a lot of things that are easily fixed with technology or other things that have been done in agriculture for decades that will still be very successful, but how do we do this safely? How do we do this humanely? How do we do this in a predictable manner that we can actually impact our communities?”

“Farmers do not necessarily need a lot of support to continue farming. People always talk about the need for government assistance. Actually, if we had lots of government assistance, that would solve our problems,” said Joe Sumers Jr., farmer and owner of Runaway Mill Farm in Hyrum, Utah. “The United States of America is the richest country in the world, and I don’t believe the farmers are asking for a handout. I do believe we’re going to lose our sovereignty, and I do believe that we’re going to lose our farms. The industry’s going to be taken over by other countries that will have less regulations that will be more protective of human health and more protective of a viable agriculture industry.”

“What I believe is that we’re at this moment in time that God has put us here, and we have a tremendous opportunity to really do something to build our family farm and preserve that way of life,” said Gene Green Jr., president of Green Family Farms in LaGrange, Ga. “I believe in my heart of hearts that we are going to come through it, and we are going to be with our faith and God’s help.”

Leave a Comment